Marilyn Elizabeth Voynick Coffee

Marilyn Elizabeth Voynick Coffee

November 11, 1933 – April 30, 2022

Elizabeth Coffee (Liz) died at home on April 30, 2022. She was predeceased by her parents, Mary Shermetta Anthony and Stanley Carl Anthony, siblings Carl Anthony and Marcia Glaser, daughter Liza Beth Voynick, first husband Joseph Voynick, Sr., and husband James D. Coffee.

She is survived by children Tamara Voynick (Paul Saletan), Joseph (Josh) Voynick Jr. (Candice), and Stanley Voynick; grandchildren Amelia Voynick Saletan (Antonio de Andrade do Carmo), Benjamin Saletan Voynick (Samantha Tynes), Lily Voynick, and Colin Voynick; step-children Elizabeth Coffee (Tim Weber), Pamela O’Connor, Lexi Coffee (Kurt Sederman); step-grandchildren Sheehan and Rowin O’Connor and many dear friends.

Liz grew up in Linden, New Jersey, and graduated from Katherine Gibbs Business School in New York City. She went to work for American Cyanamid in New York City, and then married Joe Voynick in 1953 when Joe returned from his second tour in the Navy. The couple lived and worked in Florida for a couple years before returning to New Jersey. Liz stopped working when Tamara was born in 1957, and Josh was born in 1958. In 1961 the family moved to Phoenix. Stan was born in 1963 and Liza in 1967.

Liz began evening classes at Phoenix College in 1965 and graduated with an A.A. degree as valedictorian in 1970. She worked in the Admissions Office at Phoenix College after graduation and served in the Maricopa County Community College system for 7 more years, including time as the Director of Admissions at the new Rio Salado Community College. During this time Liz earned Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees in Vocational Education from Northern Arizona University. As part of her work with the community college system she counseled and encouraged Native American students about participating in Health Occupation programs and visited reservations to promote these programs.

Liz earned her real estate license and sold homes for a few years before continuing her career in higher education as an adjunct professor at the University of Phoenix. She very much enjoyed the interactive style of teaching at the UoP and in the 1990s taught some of the first online classes. Liz retired from the University of Phoenix.

Liz met Jim Coffee in Phoenix and they married in 1994. They moved to The Sea Ranch in California and enjoyed friends, volunteer work, projects, and watching the sunset together each evening until Jim’s death in September, 2021.

We will remember Liz’s fierce love for her family, her advocacy for and dedication to children and education, her sense of style, and the generous way she accepted people into her heart. We will miss her and will always remember her and her passions.


Louis Manning Jr.


Louis Bernard Manning Jr.

May 28, 1980 – April 20, 2022

Louis attended and graduated from Wil C. Wood High School. He loved riding motorcycles, martial arts, rugby, was a phenomenal cook, and loved his family deeply.

He is survived by his wife Melissa Manning, mother Deralyn Tarpley, father Louis Bernard Manning Sr., sister Patricia Manning,  brother Chris Thompson, sons Tejon and Austin, and daughters Jewel, Julianna, and Adriana. He was preceded in death by his daughter Alessandra Manning.

His outgoing personality and laughter will be missed by all who loved him.

A visitation will be held on Saturday May 7, 2022 at 10am. The funeral service will commence at 11am and with a reception to follow at Eggen & Lance Chapel, 1540 Mendocino Ave. Santa Rosa, CA.


Michael A. Gordon


Michael A. Gordon

September 23 1954 – May 1 2022

Michael was born in San Francisco, CA to Joseph and Eileen Gordon. He was the youngest of 7 Children. He leaves a son, Joseph, and brothers, Rod, Barry, Kit and his sister Carmon. He joins his sisters Eugenia and Sandra in Heaven. Michael resided in Santa Rosa, CA for the last 32 years. He will be remembered for his dancing, laughter, and his caring heart.

Visitation will be on Friday, May 6, 2022 at 10:00 a.m. following the funeral service at 10:30 a.m. at Eggen & Lance Chapel; 1540 Mendocino Avenue in Santa Rosa. Reception to follow at Eggen & Lance’s reception hall. Graveside service will be at 2:00 p.m. at Calvary Catholic Cemetery; 2930 Bennett Valley Road in Santa Rosa.


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JOANNA BARNES, ACTRESS, AUTHOR AT 87

Joanna Barnes

Joanna Barnes died after a lengthy illness on April 29, 2022 at her home at The Sea Ranch, California. Joanna was born in 1934 in Boston and grew up in Hingham, Massachusetts. She was a graduate of Milton Academy and Smith College, where she was elected to Phi Beta Kappa. She moved to California and soon drew the attention of audiences playing the ditsy debutante, Gloria Upson, in the 1958 film Auntie Mame. She was nominated for a Golden Globe award for that performance. Coincidentally, she had herself been a debutante at the Boston Cotillion in 1952.

In 1961 she played the role of gold-digger Vicky Robinson in the original movie The Parent Trap. In the 1998 remake, she had the role of Vicki Blake, the gold-digger’s mother. Her many film credits include Home Before Dark, Spartacus, and The War Wagon. Her extensive television credits include starring in three series, 21 Beacon Street, The Trials of O’Brien, and Dateline Hollywood. She was a frequent guest on dozens of TV series including The Millionaire, Mannix, Murder She Wrote, and Cheers. Joanna was a guest on many of TV’s early quiz programs and chat shows including What’s My Line, To Tell the Truth, and The Johnny Carson Show.

While pursuing her acting career Joanna was also an author. She was a book reviewer for the Los Angeles Times. Her four published novels are The Deceivers, Who is Carla Hart, Pastora, and Silverwood.  In non-fiction she wrote Starting from Scratch, a book that grew out of her syndicated newspaper column “Touching Home”.

Joanna married the noted architect Jack Lionel Warner in 1980. They lived in Montecito, California in a house Jack designed. In 2005 they left Santa Barbara County for the serenity of The Sea Ranch where Jack designed and built a house for them overlooking the Pacific Ocean. Jack died in 2012.

Joanna’s two earlier marriages ended in divorce. Her parents John Pindar Barnes and Alice Weston (Mutch) predeceased her. She is survived by her two sisters Lally Barnes Freeman of Santa Fe, New Mexico and Judith Barnes Wood of Snellville, Georgia, and Jack’s three children: John Barnes of Goleta, California, Laura Warner of Santa Barbara, and Louise Warner of Whidby Island, Washington. A lifelong animal lover, she is also survived by her dog, Gracie Warner.

Joanna was admired and loved for her talents, her Intelligence, and her accomplishments. Of all her accolades and successes, however, one feather in her cap that always brought a full-throated laugh was that she was thrown out of the Boston Social Register when she became a professional actress.

Sally Watson


Sally Watson

1924 – 2022

Sally Watson was born in Seattle on January 28, 1924. She was the eldest child of five, born to William and Dorothy (nee Taft) Watson. Her childhood house was perched atop a hill in Seattle and she remembered that from her bedroom window she could look down over a mile of rooftops to Lake Washington. Though she lived and traveled in other parts of the world, she never forgot the beauty of Seattle and Bainbridge Island.

She was a month away from her 18th birthday when Pearl Harbor was attacked. In 1944, she joined the WAVES (women’s branch of the United States Naval Reserve), studying radio engineering in Astoria, Oregon. After the war, she briefly attended Colorado State College of Education and then used the GI Bill and her savings to complete her undergraduate degree at Reed College, where she discovered a love for learning and discourse and found friends and professors who were kindred spirits.

After she graduated from Reed in 1950, Sally spent some years living and working in various places on the West Coast. At one job in 1952, she helped with fan mail at MGM. She remembered seeing a very young and unpretentious Debbie Reynolds walking around the studio lot in jeans, bringing her lunch in a paper bag, but MGM was not a natural fit for Sally. She much preferred the intellectual stimulation of helping to lead Great Books discussion groups, making lifelong friends in the process. Later, she spent five years collaborating with her mother to create the innovative Listen and Learn Phonics program.

In 1953, Sally heard about a friend who published a story in a children’s magazine and decided on the spot to write a book for children. She sat on the edge of her bed with the typewriter balanced on a tiny table, completing the first draft in three weeks and the second draft in another three. Highland Rebel was the story of a spirited young girl living in Scotland in 1745 during the Jacobite rising. Unusually for a first-time author, Holt, a major publishing house, accepted her book without revision. It was published in 1954 and was highly successful. Also, unusually for a book at that time, the front cover portrayed a confident and strong girl wielding a sword. The next year, Sally published Mistress Malapert, about a girl who disguised herself as a boy in order to work with Shakespeare at the Globe. The books she wrote throughout the Fifties and Sixties always featured strong, opinionated heroines who rebelled against the restrictions placed on females by society. Sally’s first series of books, set in England and America between the 16th and 19th centuries, featured characters who were related by family. Some of the books contained a printed version of the complex genealogical chart Sally originally hand-wrote in calligraphic script. They are known as the Family Tree series.

When Sally visited the young country of Israel in 1957, she was so struck by what she observed of that valiant and determined nation creating itself that she wrote To Build a Land about children from around the world made refugees and orphans, traumatized by WWII, who learned to make a new life together on a kibbutz. She wrote two more books about Israel: Other Sandals (1966) and The Mukhtar’s Children (1968). Many years later, she reworked To Build a Land and self-published it as a book for adults called The Return of the Exiles (2014)

After she became a successful author, Sally used the proceeds from her books to travel the world with her mother and with friends, collecting memories and impressions she would

always treasure. In 1964, she moved to England, buying a cottage in Hampshire. While in England, she learned to make beautiful scenes painted with enamel on copper which she sold at craft fairs. She took up judo, becoming a black belt in her forties. She was a proud member of MENSA, happy to find others who shared her intellectual interests. She adored literary nonsense and satire, Gilbert and Sullivan, and Shakespeare, and could repeat many verses from memory. She loved classical music and was a synesthete, seeing music as shapes and colors.

Sally left England for the California sunshine, moving back to the US in 1987. She bought a little house in Santa Rosa and created a beautiful garden with fruit trees and a fish pond, making sure to include her favorite blue flowers, fulfilling the requirements to become a master gardener. She joined a local group which fed and fostered feral cats, and she cherished many rescue cats in her own household, giving them long and happy lives and lots of love.

Sally’s books had gone out of print in the Seventies and library copies were being sold at exorbitant prices. Devoted fans around the world still loved them and lobbied for them to be reprinted. In 2002, a small independent press (Image Cascade) decided to reprint almost all of her books. A special tea was held at the Sonoma County Central Library in Santa Rosa to celebrate. New fans read her books for the first time and lifelong fans were able to complete their collections. When fans created a listserv devoted to her writing, Sally herself decided to join it (learning to use email in her eighties) and loved exchanging thoughts directly with her readers.

Sally wrote many books in California, including a series set in ancient Egypt, more books in her series about English history, and two memoirs, among others. Even though she had been published by major houses, she was unable in a new publishing era to find an agent or a publisher. As a writer, she was compelled to create the books that came to her and it became clear that self-publishing was the only way to get her later books out to readers. In this unfamiliar milieu, Sally had to be her own editor, agent, and publicist. She worked meticulously, proofreading her manuscripts over and over, trying to get every detail just right. Even though she wished her books could be published traditionally, she had a glorious time writing them and getting to know her new characters. She had long been a loner, with a few select, very good friends, but in her last decades, she connected with fans and was amazed at having made so many new friends late in life.

Like the heroines of her books, Sally cared little for societal expectations. She said that from a very young age, she had no desire to marry or have children: “I wanted to have adventures!” With her books, she nurtured generations of female readers (and male readers fond of good writing and exciting escapades) who learned about courage and unlimited possibility from her indomitable characters. As she neared her 98th birthday, Sally mused often on what a wonderful life she felt she’d had. She’d done just as she liked and said her life had been “gorgeous.” As a young woman, Sally performed with a team of Highland dancers, and she recalled the glory of hearing the music while leaping high above the ground, saying it felt like flying. Freed from the infirmities of mortal life, she dances once more.

Sally died peacefully on March 11, 2022. Although she outlived most of her family and contemporaries, she leaves behind a cousin, nieces, and nephews. She is survived by her writing, her beloved cat Saffron, and by many friends who miss her dearly.


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Lynn Joseph Reiter


Lynn Joseph Reiter

1949 – 2022

Lynn Joseph Reiter, 73, of Windsor, California passed away on March 22, 2022 at Sutter Hospital. He was born January 9, 1949 in Sharon, Pennsylvania. Lynn was the son of the late Joseph C. Reiter and Pauline McLaughlin-Reiter.

Lynn graduated from Sharon High School in 1966, immediately joined the Navy and had a tour of Duty In Viet Nam. After returning to home, he went to work for a television station in Youngstown, Ohio. He attended Youngstown University where he earned an Associates Degree. He met the woman of his dreams while there, got married to Mary-Jane Klein, then he completed his studies and earned an MBS at University of Toledo. He and his wife moved to California, he was employed by Varian Industry. He became involved with lighting equipment for motion pictures and laser lighting for medical equipment. He was also employed by ILC Technology where he was the Marketing Vice President.

Lynn will be greatly missed by his family and friends. He excelled at being a son, brother, and uncle. He was generous to a fault, kind, and was always available when needed. He volunteered as a Guy Friday for the town of Windsor. He was the go-to guy for booth set-ups, beer booth, he was the treasurer and sat in on many committees for the betterment of downtown Windsor, Marketing, Parking, Signage are just some of the issues he assisted with. He was also involved with an Association called SCORE it is the nations largest network of volunteer, expert business mentors. (service Corps of Retired Executives).

Lynn was a very intelligent man always looking for ways to improve himself and others. He enjoyed computer work, reading, walking, hiking. He loved nature, loved walking on the beach and in the Redwood forests. He was often found in the evenings with his friends at Mutt Lynch Winery. His visits home with family are going to be missed. He was loved so much.

In addition to his parents, Lynn was preceded in death by his sister Carolyn Jean Reiter and a nephew Lloyd Joseph Kelly. He is survived by his ex-wife Mary-Jane Reiter, Sally L. Naples (sister), 2 brothers: John. B. Reiter, Paul A. Reiter, nieces: Stephanie Mazzocco, Elizabeth Mazzocco, and nephews: Steven J. Kelly and Jakeb A. Kelly.

A service will be held at Eggen & Lance Funeral Home, 1540 Mendocino Avenue, Santa Rosa, California on April 22, 2022 from 4PM to 7PM. A service will be done by Allan Foster, a non-denominational Preacher.

In lieu of Flowers, please make memorial donations to a local library or the Depression and Bi-polar support alliance.

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Joyce Greer


Joyce Greer

1968 – 2022

Joyce Greer, age 89, passed away in her home on December 17, 2021, from complications from a stroke. She leaves behind a legacy of joy and grace.

Joyce was born in River Falls, Wisconsin to Harry and Agnes Johnson on August 14, 1932. She attended River Falls High School and was an award winning majorette. She enjoyed cheerleading and participating in community events with her tight knit group of girlfriends. Her love of cheering others on lasted well into her adulthood- she was known to get so worked up during a ’49ers game that she would have to stop watching and vacuum to soothe her nerves.
After she graduated high school, Joyce moved to Washington DC and worked for Reynolds Metals. Then she met the love of her life, William Greer. He proposed to her while they were parked under the Washington Monument. Their wedding was attended by friends, and they traveled around the United States on their honeymoon to meet each other’s families and celebrate their new union.

In Bill’s 21 years of service in the Air Force, they were stationed in Virginia, Alaska, California, Louisiana, and Illinois. They had two daughters, lived in Alaska when it became a state, and made lifelong friends at each military base. In 1968 they finally settled down in the brand-new Rohnert Park. They enjoyed a trip to Hawaii for their 25th anniversary. Joyce worked as a lunch lady at Rohnert Park Junior High for over 20 years. Both on and off the job, she was known as a baker who made delicious cookies.

In retirement, Joyce and Bill loved travelling around the United States in their RV. Joyce was always anxious leading up to the trip, but once they were on the road she was as free as a bird. They visited military friends near and far and never passed up a chance to go back to Alaska. She also volunteered at Sutter Hospice Thrift Store for over 20 years.
Joyce never forgot to send a card for any of life’s big moments. She loved watching birds in the backyard and would always declare that the presents under the Christmas tree were “too pretty to open”. She was notorious for uncontrollable cry-laughing with her mother, sister, and daughter.

She is preceded in death by her parents, husband William Greer, and siblings Donald Johnson, Beverly (Roy) Hanson, Allan (Sharee) Johnson, and Larry (Bonnie) Johnson.

She is survived by daughters, Robin Greer (Bruce Griewe) and Stacey (Dave) Dougherty; granddaughters, Jaime (Ashley) Evans and Delaney Dougherty.

A service will be held on Tuesday the 28th 10-1pm. Eggen and Lance Chapel, 1540 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa.

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